Speaker Pumps Up Audience

Duane+Myko+made+his+debut+at+RHS+Nov.+19.+He+excited+the+crowd+with+music+and+poetry+in+his+relatable+words.+--Meklit+Bekele

Duane Myko made his debut at RHS Nov. 19. He excited the crowd with music and poetry in his relatable words. --Meklit Bekele

Duane Myko made his debut at RHS Nov. 19. He excited the crowd with music and poetry in his relatable words. --Meklit Bekele
Duane Myko made his debut at RHS Nov. 19. He excited the crowd with music and poetry in his relatable words. –Meklit Bekele

With lasers beaming, beach balls bouncing and music bumping, the stage was set for motivational speaker Duane Myko to change young lives.

Myko has entertained and motivated over 390,000 students across the country. Since 2011, his style has appealed to high school age kids, with hot tracks like Rae Strummond’s “No Type” and Migo’s “Fight Night” playing throughout his presentation.

On Nov. 19, students were treated to the Duane Myko experience, a three-part play of “poetry, comedy and entertainment,” as he described it in his introduction. The play is known as “Should, Could, Dream” and is loosely based on Myko’s peers and personal experiences growing up.

English teacher Ambereen Khan-Baker, as one of the coordinators of the Pre-ACES and AVID programs, worked with College-Career Info Coordinator Janet Harris to bring Myko to Rockville. “He’s pretty well-known in the country. Mrs. Harris has been in touch with him and knows him really well, and we looked at his website. He looked highly engaging,” Khan-Baker said.

Myko’s debut at Rockville captivated the crowd. After having both sides of the auditorium compete to make the most noise, Myko asked the crowd an exciting question: “Ya��all wanna turn up?”

The crowd demanded it.

“I was told Rockville is the most turnt up high school out there!” Myko said as he tossed another ball into the crowd. The presentation then began with Myko explaining the “Should” character and taking on the role.

“Should,” named for all the responsible actions he “should” have done, was shown as a class clown known for his lack of homework and surplus of wise cracks. “Could,” had ambitions but struggled to focus. “Dream,” meanwhile, represented the hardworking attitude Myko wanted the audience to emulate.

Junior Laura Kjellman enjoyed the performance, and said afterwards she understood the message. “He relates to his audience well and puts it in terms we will understand rather than someone lecturing us until we fall asleep.”

Myko, by taking breaks from character at different times to explain lessons, was able to both teach values and entertain, all in a concert-atmosphere.

Junior Joanna Klinedinst said, “There were a lot of people that I saw who really enjoyed his presentation. Not everyone responds well to a lecture about getting their act together, but he used his own experiences to connect with the students and a lot of them were able to understand his message better since it was told in a form they understood and enjoyed.”